Florida State University Nickname: Seminoles
Despite an ever-increasing era of political correctness, Florida State continues to embrace the Seminole Indian
heritage of their state. Former FSU president, Dr. Dale Lick has publicly stated that the school attempts to reflect a
positive light on the tribe's "noble, brave and courageous people," He has also expressed that the school has
maintained a great relationship with the tribe by treating Seminole symbols With dignity and correctness.

After playing the first two football games in their inaugural 1947 season without a symbol, the students demanded
that one be found. The Statesmen fell second to Seminoles in a student body vote. Other contenders included
Rebels, Tarpons, Fighting Warriors and Crackers. Can you imagine Bobby Bowden now leading his fighting
"Saltine's" on the field?

The FSU Seminole war chant has echoed throughout many collegiate stadiums since its refinement in the early 80's.
The intimidating and sometimes deafening cheer was first started by the school's band, the Marching Chiefs. An
added dimension of a chopping motion was developed by the FSU fans and included a repetitious bend at the elbow.
This Seminole cheer grew into a national phenomenon when

Once the Seminole nickname was established it wasn't long before a pair of students dressed as Indians joined the
cheerleaders in supporting the school. This eventually evolved into the establishment of Chief Osceola and
Renegade's mascot reign at the university.

Perhaps the most exhilarating pregame ceremony in college football takes place at FSU home games when the
school's mascot stirs the passions of Seminole fans as they prepare for their opponent's massacre. This frenzied
moment includes a battle dressed Chief Osceola racing on to the field on an appaloosa horse named Renegade.
The intensity builds to a climax when the chief heaves a flaming lance at mid field just prior to the opening kickoff.
Perhaps fittingly this tradition was introduced just before a 1978 game against the Oklahoma State Cowboys.

Former FSU assistant coach and College Football Conference Call radio host, Max Howell, describes this exciting
moment, "If you're out there and you don't get chill bumps, you're a dead man," he said. "That tradition is the most
unreal that I've ever been around. It's unbelievable."

Opposing players that visit Doak Campbell Stadium often gain quite an impression from the pregame buildup as
well. Former University of Tulsa quarterback Richie Stephenson still vividly remembers being shocked prior to his
team's 1985 kickoff against the Seminoles. "It's the closest I've ever come to having a heart attack. We'd just won the
coin toss and our offensive team was huddled on the field near the sideline. Suddenly the guy across from me eyes
get as big as basketballs, Stephenson exclaimed.

"I turn around to see what's going on and this huge horse with a screaming Indian riding it, is running straight at me
and is nearly on top of me. The crowd's roaring and the Indian is holding a flaming spear." Pausing to laugh,
Stephenson added, "I almost dropped to my knees. I thought I was dead."

Atlanta Braves fans transformed it into the tomahawk chop during the 1991 playoffs and World Series.
Florida State Mascot: Chief Osceola Declares War
Perhaps the most exhilarating pregame ceremony in college football takes place at FSU home games when the
school's mascot stirs the passions of Seminole fans as they prepare for their opponent's massacre.  This frenzied
moment includes a battle dressed Chief Osceola racing on to the field on an appaloosa horse named Renegade.  
The intensity builds to a climax when the chief heaves a flaming lance at midfield just prior to the opening kickoff.  
Perhaps fittingly this tradition was introduced just before a 1978 game against the Oklahoma State Cowboys.

Former FSU assistant coach and regional sports radio host, Max Howell, describes this exciting moment, "If you're
out there and you don't get chill bumps, you're a dead man," he said.  "That tradition is the most unreal that I've ever
been around.  It's unbelievable."

Opposing players that visit Doak Campbell Stadium often gain quite an impression from the pregame buildup as
well.  Former University of Tulsa quarterback Richie Stephenson still vividly remembers being shocked prior to his
team’s 1985 kickoff against the Seminoles.

"It's the closest I've ever come to having a heart attack.  We'd just won the coin toss and our offensive team was
huddled on the field near the sideline.  Suddenly the guy across from me eyes get as big as basketballs,
Stephenson exclaimed.  "I turn around to see what's going on and this huge horse with a screaming Indian riding it,
is running straight at me and is nearly on top of me.   The crowd's roaring and the Indian is holding a flaming
spear."  Pausing to laugh, Stephenson added, "I almost dropped to my knees.  I thought I was dead."
FSU Mascot - Chief OsceolaFlorida State's Chief Osceola
Chief Osceola carries on the
proud Seminole tradition and
takes school spirit to new
FSU Uniform and School Colors History
The first championship teams at Florida State donned purple and gold uniforms. If you're considering having the color
of your television adjusted, have no fear. Those glory years were back in 1905 when the school was known as Florida
State College. One year later the school became a woman's college and adopted crimson as the official color.
Eventually the crimson was combined with the purple from past days to form the garnet that FSU now combines with
gold. The garnet and gold uniforms first premiered in a 1947 game against Stetson.

FSU's gold helmets with garnet and white spears on both sides distinguish the Seminole uniforms which were
named the "best in college football" in a 1991 Sporting News fan poll. The school has had the same basic design
since Bobby Bowden arrived in 1976.
College Football's Most Recognizable Cheer: The "Seminole War Chant"
Discover How it Got Started

The FSU Seminole war chant has echoed throughout many collegiate stadiums since its refinement in the early 80's.  
The intimidating and sometimes deafening cheer was first started by the school's band, the Marching Chiefs.                 
 
An added dimension of a chopping motion was developed by the FSU fans and included a repetitious bend at the
elbow. This Seminole cheer grew into a national phenomenon when Atlanta Braves fans transformed it into the
tomahawk chop during the 1991 playoffs and World Series.
Florida State Traditions: Burying Their Opponents at Sod Cemetery
Long before Bobby Bowden's teams became "King's of the Road" with many convincing road wins, a tradition related
to road success was born. Following a 1962, 18-0 upset over Georgia in the Bulldog's Sanford stadium, the FSU
football team captains returned to Tallahassee with a piece of turf from the field. The turf was presented to Dean Cole
E. Moore who founded the "Sod game" tradition.

Former Seminole assistant coach Max Howell said that the Sod games were always the big ones.

"FSU built their program by playing on the road and they'd designate the big ones as sod games," he said. "If they won
the game they'd dig up grass from the middle of the field and bury it in Sod Cemetery by the practice field. If it was an
artificial turf game they would find grass somewhere, even if it was under the stadium stands or outside the dressing
room," he added.

Initially all wins on the road that had the Seminoles in the underdog role were considered as sod games. With the rise
of the FSU program to a near dynasty level, the Tribe now only counts Bowl games and contests that they've been pick
to lose as worthy of adding another monument to Sod Cemetery.

To mark each Sod game victory, a tombstone with the date and the score of the game is added to the burial grounds.
While many schools are represented in the cemetery, three schools have quite a presence. Through the 1998
season, seven victories over both Miami and Florida are marked, while six wins over Nebraska are memorialized.
Seminoles that Made it to the Silver Screen
After leaving FSU he gained "The Longest Yard!"
Before Burt Reynolds launched his movie career and starred as a signal-calling prisoner in the movie, The Longest
Yard, the famous actor played for the Seminoles. Reynolds gained 134 yards his freshman season during a year that
was highlighted by a 54-yard touchdown scamper against Auburn.

A knee injury suffered in an auto accident detoured Reynolds rushing career, but he did play cornerback before leaving
for Hollywood.

Robert Urich is well known for this television movie roles that have included "Vegas," "Spencer for Hire" and most
recently the "Lazarus Man." Before packing for Southern California, Urich played on FSU's offensive line in 1964 and '
65.
The Longest Yard
Burt Reynolds brought
tremendous talent to FSU,
but his football career
ended prematurely due to
injury
Sod Cemetery
Florida State football was built to
championship levels by playing
powerful teams on the road.  
Find out what the FSU team
brought back to the Florida State
campus to commemorate their
victory!
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FSU Mascot - Chief OsceolaFlorida State Nickname, Mascots and Traditions
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FSU's New Mascot: Cimarron
The University reaches into its past to
bring fans something new
A costumed kid and fan-friendly character
named Cimarron will grace the football
sidelines, additional athletic events and other
university related functions.  Based on a former
Florida State mascot of the same name,
Cimarron will now have much more visibility
than its predecessor that was relegated to
more of an on-paper existence, Cimarron will
be able to represent the school at events not
suitable for the more rugged chief Osceola and
Renegade.
In his previous tenure at FSU,
Cimarron was featured more as
a logo than an actual mascot.
Decked out in a non-intimidating
costume, this fluffy mascot will be
well received at all school-related
events.
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